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for Toxin-Free Beds


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Poison in Flameproof Beds
Doctor & Public Comments
Table of Chemicals in Beds
Chemicals Absorbed
Pounds Poison in Beds
Proponents Say & Rebuttals
Children Vulnerable
Antimony linked to SIDS
Antimony Risks
Boric Acid Risks
Wool Burns
EPA proves FR beds Toxic
People already sick

CPSC Risk Assessment
Vote-Poison in Beds

See More Health Risks at:
PeopleForCleanBeds.org




 


 


 

“Don't fool yourself.  Boric acid _is_ a poison, and a pesticide.  It's  not 'safe' around children and pets with no further qualification.  It's safer than some other pesticides, but only if used in an appropriate manner, which does not include sprinkling it hither and yon.  There is no safe substance, only safe use.

The boric acid MSDS (Materials Safety Data Sheet) hazard warning reads:

"WARNING! HARMFUL IF SWALLOWED OR INHALED. CAUSES IRRITATION TO SKIN, EYES AND RESPIRATORY TRACT. AFFECTS CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, LIVER AND KIDNEYS."  A little further along in the MSDS, you'll find: "Adult fatal dose reported at 5 to > 30 grams."  5 grams is about the weight of two pennies, so even though it's not in a class with nicotine, it's not something you want to use with wild abandon.  Boric acid is also toxic to aquatic life, so should never be used in a way such that it can wash into surface or ground water.” http://groups.google.com/groups?q=boric+acid+safety&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&selm=uzzd5.4617%24W06.354105%40sol.newscene.com&rnum=4


(5)
“There's an additional problem with boron compounds--they tend to
bioaccumulate.  So the more often you're exposed, and the higher doses
you're exposed to, the more likely you are to have trouble eventually.”  http://groups.google.com/groups?q=boric+acid+msds&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&selm=allyn-0806002137070001%40cornetto.chem.washington.edu&rnum=1


Material Safety Data Sheet, MSDS on Boric Acid

http://www.jtbaker.com/msds/englishhtml/b3696.htm


EFFECTS OF SHORT-TERM EXPOSURE:

The substance irritates the eyes, the skin and the respiratory tract. The substance may cause effects on the gastrointestinal tract, liver and kidneys.


EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM OR REPEATED EXPOSURE:

Repeated or prolonged contact with skin may cause dermatitis. Animal tests show that this substance possibly causes toxic effects upon human reproduction. http://www.inchem.org/documents/icsc/icsc/eics0991.htm

Under an OSHA Hazard Communication Standard, based on animal chronic toxicity studies of inorganic borate chemicals, boric acid and/or borates are Hazardous Materials. California has identified boric acid as a hazardous waste. The above information is taken from Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) 25-80-2320 (Section 2 and 13) supplied by U.S. Borax Inc. (the major supplier of borax to many industries).

The National Academy of Sciences reports that children may be uniquely sensitive to chemicals and pesticide residues because of their rapid tissue growth and development. Most laboratory tests are performed on fully grown adult laboratory animals.

On page 312 of the National Academy of Sciences' report Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children (under the section entitled "Non-dietary Exposure to Pesticides") boric acid is cited as one of the pesticides/fungicides that can induce adverse skin reactions such as contact dermatitis and hyperkeratosis with dermal contact of treated surfaces.

Boric acid contained traces of arsenic, a chemical known to the State of California to cause cancer. U.S. Borax was able to use the EPA de minimus policy, which accepts that zero is not absolute, but very, very small to remove arsenic from its Material Safety Data Sheet. I personally do not see any risk with the trace amount of arsenic at 1 part per million in boric acid and/or borates if used in an appropriate application method. But, not where there will be constant direct contact

http://devinefarm.net/rp/rpboric.htm

 

[Proponents of Boric Acid make a weak argument saying huge quantities are given to mice and attaching the science of Toxicology. Low doses are also tested on mice, rats, rabbits, and dogs. Below is an explanation of this science.] … Years of experience have shown that toxicity data obtained from a number of animal species can be useful in predicting human toxicity, while predictions based on data obtained from a single animal species may be inaccurate. The second premise is that by exposing animals to large doses of a chemical for short periods of time, we can predict human toxicity due to exposure to small doses for long periods of time.

Toxicology, The Science of Poisons, By University of California, Berkeley http://devinefarm.net/rp/rpboric2.htm


Children and infants on which boron compounds are used for medication can become acutely ill with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, circulatory collapse, skin rash and confusion . Fatal poisonings often involve kidney failure. Acute poisonings are rare and are generally associated with deliberate use of concentrated boron products. Other adverse effects that do not include any immediate symptoms of illness can occur when smaller amounts of boron are used on a regular basis. These injuries are not as well known but involve stunted growth (in experimental animals) and infertility in human beings. http://www.ohd.hr.state.or.us/dwp/docs/fact/boron.pdf

 

Alternatives to brominated flame retardants

[It appears there are no safe flame retardant chemicals for long-term exposure as in beds. Even with Melamine there is a risk of formation of stones in the urinary bladder.]


Boric acid can be formed, if zinc borate gets in contact with water e.g. body fluids.


Based on comparison with sodium borate and boric acid, respectively, the possible main effects are expected to be:

* Irritation of skin, eyes and throat

* Harm to the unborn child

http://www.mst.dk/default.asp?Sub=http://www.mst.dk/udgiv/publications/2000/87-7944-218-8/html/kap05_eng.htm

 

Exposure to pesticides is linked with various dysfunctions to human health and the environment. The traditional focus of studies has been on the ability of an agent to cause cancer. But more recent studies are showing that pesticides also can damage the endocrine, neurological and immune systems. Effects can be subtle and can show up decades or generations after exposure, so it is difficult to prove an immediate cause and effect.

 

The best way to minimize pesticide risks is to avoid use in the first place. Follow the example of the National PTA, which has endorsed minimizing children's exposure to toxic agents. [Talks about general pesticides but conclusions also relate to poisoning mattress] http://www.ecocitycleveland.org/health/lawn_care.html

 

Strobel is concerned about the overuse of FRCs. We manufacture Specialty Sleep (New Technology) mattresses that perform better than Innerspring mattresses by providing Clinically Proven Better Sleep, Proven Best Back Support, and 90% Less Tossing and Turning. To learn more about our Patented Supple-Pedic mattresses click here. We are opposed to new regulations that will be detrimental to the comfort and performance of our mattresses, but more importantly we are opposed to these new regulations because we believe they will jeopardize the public health!

 

Do Flame Retardants Harm Unborn?

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/09/05/earlyshow/saturday/main571864.shtml

 

Flame retardant found in breast milk

http://www.drbobmartin.com/2003k_09_23news05.html

 

Study: Fire Retardants Found In Breast Milk

http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/news/092303ap_nw_breast_milk.html

Full Text of Study: Finds Record High Levels of Toxic Fire Retardants in Breast Milk from American Mothers

 

The study by the Environmental Working Group backs previous studies that show American women have the world's highest levels of the bromine-based fire retardants, nearing levels that have been shown to damage learning, memory and behavior in laboratory mice.

http://www.ewg.org/reports/mothersmilk/printversion.php

 

University of Texas School of Public Health and UT Southwestern Medical Center study: (Original Study)

Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) in U.S. Mothers’ Milk

Arnold Schecter,1 Marian Pavuk,1 Olaf Päpke,2 John Jake Ryan,3 Linda Birnbaum,4 and Robin Rosen 5

1 University of Texas Health Sciences Center, School of Public Health, Dallas Regional Campus, Dallas, Texas, USA; 2 ERGO Research,

Hamburg, Germany; 3 Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 4 Environmental Toxicology Research Laboratories, U.S. Environmental

Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA; 5 University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dallas, Texas, USA

http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/ 2003/6466/abstract.pdf

 

University of Texas: Studies find mothers' milk carries industrial chemicals

http://www.fox11az.com/scitech/sci/stories/092303dnmetmothersmilk.3f8bd.html

 

BOSTON -- Two studies reveal that a toxic chemical that makes objects fire resistant is turning up in the breast milk of American women.

http://www.wesh.com/health/2506909/detail.html

 

Studies have linked some chemicals in the flame retardants to effects on brain function, reduced male fertility and damaged ovarian development

http://www.msnbc.com/news/970665.asp?0cv=HA01

 

 It’s not clear how PDBEs enter the body although it’s possible they are ingested through dust or by other inhalation at home, the group’s study suggested.

 

Though banned in the late 1970s, PCBs still pollute major waterways. PBDEs are turning out to be as toxic as PCBs

http://www.checnet.org/healthehouse/education/articles-detail.asp?Main_ID=581

 

PBDEs are remarkably similar to PCBs, a class of chemicals banned in 1976 because it was found to cause immune suppression, altered sexual development, cancer, delayed brain development, lower IQ, and behavioral problems like hyperactivity in humans. As with PCBs, exposure to PBDEs may be particularly harmful during a critical window of brain development during pregnancy and early childhood

 

North American industry used 74 million pounds of PBDEs in 1999, accounting for half the world market.

http://www.environmentcalifornia.org/envirocaliftoxics.asp?id2=9719

 

Experience with PCBs shows that failure to act on early warnings can lead to irreversible environmental contamination and damage to health. 

Scientists discovered the first indications of systemic harm caused by PCBs as early as 1937. However, PCBs were not banned until 1976, after hundreds of scientific studies documented widespread exposure and actual harm to human health. Further study showed new forms of health impact caused by lower levels of exposure, which continue to be documented decades after the chemicals were phased out.

GROWING THREATS

Toxic Flame Retardants and Children’s Health (48 page report)

http://www.environmentcalifornia.org/reports/GrowingThreats03.pdf

 

Toxic Flame Retardants, As early as 1998, scientists found PBDE levels rising exponentially in women's breast milk.

http://environmentcalifornia.org/envirocaliftoxics.asp?id2=9744&id3=CEtoxics&

  

High Body Burdens of 2,2´,4,4´-Tetrabromodiphenyl Ether (BDE-47) in California Women

http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/2003/6220/abstract.html

 

Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Maternal and Fetal Blood Samples

Anita Mazdai,1 Nathan G. Dodder,2 Mary Pell Abernathy,1 Ronald A. Hites,2 and Robert M. Bigsby1 

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA; 2Department of Chemistry and School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/2003/6146/abstract.html 

 

The sperm counts of men have dropped by 50%

http://www.wwf.org.uk/chemicals/glossary.asp

 

PCBs

http://www.acsh.org/publications/reports/pcupdate.html

 

Study Examines Flame Retardants

http://www.firehouse.com/news/2000/4/28_APflame.html

 

Antimony oxide is used to produce fire retardants. Breathing or ingesting high levels of antimony for a long time can cause heart and lung problems, joint or muscle pain, stomach pain, diarrhea, vomiting and stomach ulcers.

http://www.epa.state.oh.us/opp/mercury_pbt/fact102.pdf

 

Swedish study found that a flame retardant

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2003-04-23-teflon-usat_x.htm

 

Swedish institute proposes brominated flame retardants ban

http://www.edie.net/gf.cfm?L=left_frame.html&R=http://www.edie.net/news/Archive/926.html

 

HALOGENATED FLAME RETARDANTS

http://archive.greenpeace.org/toxics/hfr.html

 

15 March 1999, KemI proposes a prohibition of flame retardants

http://www.kemi.se/aktuellt/pressmedd/1999/990312_eng.htm

 

Healthy or Safe Housing

http://www.sccs.com/sccshhos.htm

 

Approximately 75%was used as a fire-retardant additive under

the name “Dechlorane,”

http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/roc/tenth/profiles/s115mire.pdf

 

Brominated Flame Retardants, Background and Issues

http://www.greenstart.org/efc9/bfrs/background.htm

Though the USA has the world's toughest flame retardancy standards, 3,000 people die in fires each year. The Chemical Manufacturers Association estimates the number would be up to 960 higher without such flame retardants 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2003-09-22-breast-milk_x.htm

 

Links to References:

“Demand for flame retardants in the US is projected to increase nearly four percent per year to 1.2 billion pounds in 2005... This assessment of the one billion pound US market for flame retardants...” http://www.marketresearch.com/map/prod/738639.html

“The flame retardant chemicals industry has historically been driven by regulations and standards.” http://www.marketresearch.com/map/prod/909190.html

(1) “Government regulations and industry standards obligate manufactures to add flame-retardants to a wide range of products used everyday. Many of these flame retardant products are toxic...  The benefits of protecting people from death and property from damage resulting from fires must be weighed against exposure to chemicals that are potentially harmful to human health and the environment.” http://www.marketresearch.com/map/prod/924720.html

 

More Reports http://www.marketresearch.com/map/cat/707.html

 

 

Do Flame Retardants Harm Unborn? http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/09/05/earlyshow/saturday/main571864.shtml

Flame retardant found in breast milk http://www.drbobmartin.com/2003k_09_23news05.html

Study: Fire Retardants Found In Breast Milk http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/news/092303ap_nw_breast_milk.html


Full Text of Study: Finds Record High Levels of Toxic Fire Retardants in Breast Milk from American Mothers.  The study by the Environmental Working Group backs previous studies that show American women have the world's highest levels of the bromine-based fire retardants, nearing levels that have been shown to damage learning, memory and behavior in laboratory mice. http://www.ewg.org/reports/mothersmilk/printversion.php

University of Texas School of Public Health and UT Southwestern Medical Center study: (Original Study)

Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) in U.S. Mothers’ Milk

Arnold Schecter,1 Marian Pavuk,1 Olaf Päpke,2 John Jake Ryan,3 Linda Birnbaum,4 and Robin Rosen 5

1 University of Texas Health Sciences Center, School of Public Health, Dallas Regional Campus, Dallas, Texas, USA; 2 ERGO Research,

Hamburg, Germany; 3 Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 4 Environmental Toxicology Research Laboratories, U.S. Environmental

Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA; 5 University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dallas, Texas, USA http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/ 2003/6466/abstract.pdf

University of Texas: Studies find mothers' milk carries industrial chemicals http://www.fox11az.com/scitech/sci/stories/092303dnmetmothersmilk.3f8bd.html

BOSTON -- Two studies reveal that a toxic chemical that makes objects fire resistant is turning up in the breast milk of American women. http://www.wesh.com/health/2506909/detail.html

Studies have linked some chemicals in the flame retardants to effects on brain function, reduced male fertility and damaged ovarian development http://www.msnbc.com/news/970665.asp?0cv=HA01

It’s not clear how PDBEs enter the body although it’s possible they are ingested through dust or by other inhalation at home, the group’s study suggested.

Though banned in the late 1970s, PCBs still pollute major waterways. PBDEs are turning out to be as toxic as PCBs
http://www.checnet.org/healthehouse/education/articles-detail.asp?Main_ID=581

PBDEs are remarkably similar to PCBs, a class of chemicals banned in 1976 because it was found to cause immune suppression, altered sexual development, cancer, delayed brain development, lower IQ, and behavioral problems like hyperactivity in humans. As with PCBs, exposure to PBDEs may be particularly harmful during a critical window of brain development during pregnancy and early childhood

North American industry used 74 million pounds of PBDEs in 1999, accounting for half the world market. http://www.environmentcalifornia.org/envirocaliftoxics.asp?id2=9719

Experience with PCBs shows that failure to act on early warnings can lead to irreversible environmental contamination and damage to health. 

Scientists discovered the first indications of systemic harm caused by PCBs as early as 1937. However, PCBs were not banned until 1976, after hundreds of scientific studies documented widespread exposure and actual harm to human health. Further study showed new forms of health impact caused by lower levels of exposure, which continue to be documented decades after the chemicals were phased out.

GROWING THREATS

Toxic Flame Retardants and Children’s Health (48 page report) http://www.environmentcalifornia.org/reports/GrowingThreats03.pdf

Toxic Flame Retardants, As early as 1998, scientists found PBDE levels rising exponentially in women's breast milk. http://environmentcalifornia.org/envirocaliftoxics.asp?id2=9744&id3=CEtoxics&

High Body Burdens of 2,2´,4,4´-Tetrabromodiphenyl Ether (BDE-47) in California Women http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/2003/6220/abstract.html

Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Maternal and Fetal Blood Samples

Anita Mazdai,1 Nathan G. Dodder,2 Mary Pell Abernathy,1 Ronald A. Hites,2 and Robert M. Bigsby1 

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA; 2Department of Chemistry and School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/2003/6146/abstract.html

The sperm counts of men have dropped by 50% http://www.wwf.org.uk/chemicals/glossary.asp


PCBs http://www.acsh.org/publications/reports/pcupdate.html

Study Examines Flame Retardants http://www.firehouse.com/news/2000/4/28_APflame.html

Antimony oxide is used to produce fire retardants. Breathing or ingesting high levels of antimony for a long time can cause heart and lung problems, joint or muscle pain, stomach pain, diarrhea, vomiting and stomach ulcers. http://www.epa.state.oh.us/opp/mercury_pbt/fact102.pdf

Swedish study found that a flame retardant
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2003-04-23-teflon-usat_x.htm

Swedish institute proposes brominated flame retardants ban http://www.edie.net/gf.cfm?L=left_frame.html&R=http://www.edie.net/news/Archive/926.html

HALOGENATED FLAME RETARDANTS http://archive.greenpeace.org/toxics/hfr.html

15 March 1999, KemI proposes a prohibition of flame retardants http://www.kemi.se/aktuellt/pressmedd/1999/990312_eng.htm

Healthy or Safe Housing http://www.sccs.com/sccshhos.htm

Approximately 75%was used as a fire-retardant additive under the name “Dechlorane,” http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/roc/tenth/profiles/s115mire.pdf

Brominated Flame Retardants, Background and Issues http://www.greenstart.org/efc9/bfrs/background.htm


(2)  USA Today: “
Though the USA has the world's toughest flame retardancy standards, 3,000 people die in fires each year. The Chemical Manufacturers Association estimates the number would be up to 960 higher without such flame retardants”  http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2003-09-22-breast-milk_x.htm

Political Action Links and Documents

 

The links below can also be reached at: http://www.strobel.com/law.htm

 

News Release: New Gov. Regulation Threatens Health

(Click Here, Text (same as this letter) explains implications and how it will become a National standard) http://www.strobel.com/newsrelease.htm

Strobel is concerned about the overuse of FRCs. We manufacture Specialty Sleep (New Technology) mattresses that perform better than Innerspring mattresses by providing Clinically Proven Better Sleep, Proven Best Back Support, and 90% Less Tossing and Turning. To learn more about our Patented Supple-Pedic mattresses click here. We are opposed to new regulations that will be detrimental to the comfort and performance of our mattresses, but more importantly we are opposed to these new regulations because we believe they will jeopardize the public health!

 

Write or call your legislators, find their email and street addresses below:

California Senators

(Click here) to find the email and street address of your State Senator. Email or call your representative with your concerns. http://www.senate.ca.gov/~newsen/senators/senators.htp

California State Assembly

 (Click here) to find the email and street address of your assembly representative. Email or call your representative with your concerns. http://www.assembly.ca.gov/acs/defaulttext.asp

 

California Governor, State Capitol Building, Sacramento, CA 95814, Phone: 916-445-2841, Fax: 916-445-4633, governor@governor.ca.gov

 

United States President, E-mail: president@whitehouse.gov Washington Office:1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, US 20500, Phone: (202) 456-1414, Fax: (202) 456-2461

 

 Congress.org Click here to find all Federal, State, and Local Representatives email, street addresses, and phones. http://www.congress.org

 

Full text of California Assembly Bill 603

 

Full Text of California Bureau of Home Furnishings and Thermal Insulation Technical Bulletin 603 (requires pdf viewer) Drawings of test methods at end of document.

 

Newer Stories and Research links:

From the Los Angeles Times: “… Many say they are dismayed that industry and society have forgotten lessons learned from the toxic legacies of the past. … 'Didn't we learn from PCBs?'" http://eces.org/articles/000093.php

 

“… says it's a never-ending battle. Grey says she wants to know how the products get to market in the first place. … "It's only after they've been using them and that they've exposed humans to these hazards that they say it is dangerous," she says. Both Grey and Dewailly say they wonder why such effects aren't discovered during pre-testing before companies market the products.” http://www.cbc.ca/stories/2003/09/17/pollutants030917

 

Seattle Times, “Potential 'toxic threat': Flame-retardant chemicals … “ http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2001863781_toxics24m.html

(3) “California's ban did not include Deca because the science was incomplete and the chemical industry argued that Deca molecules were too big to be absorbed by people's bodies. … "The latest science clearly points to the need for a federal ban of Deca and other toxic flame retardants," said U.S. PIRG's Purvis. "We cannot continue to expose children or adults to harmful chemicals like Deca while we wait for health impacts to develop. Harmful chemicals should not be placed on the market in the first place." http://www.ems.org/rls/2004/02/18/new_report_finds.html